26 November 2010

Ultrathin alternative to silicon for future electronics

Ultrathin alternative to silicon for future electronics

November 22, 2010
There's good news in the search for the next generation of semiconductors. Researchers with the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California Berkeley, have successfully integrated ultra-thin layers of the semiconductor indium arsenide onto a silicon substrate to create a nanoscale transistor with excellent electronic properties. A member of the III–V family of semiconductors, indium arsenide offers several advantages as an alternative to silicon including superior electron mobility and velocity, which makes it an oustanding candidate for future low-power, high-speed electronic devices.

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19 November 2010

USC to launch social technology lab

USC to launch social-technology laboratory

The Annenberg Innovation Lab would bring together professors and students from cinema, media, engineering and other programs to design software prototypes for emerging medias.

|By David Sarno, Los Angeles Times

USC is starting a social-technology laboratory with a focus on the segments of digital culture that are expected to bring in the big bucks.

The Annenberg Innovation Lab, which the university is announcing Wednesday, will harness expertise from professors and students across a variety of disciplines — including its cinema, media and engineering programs — to design software prototypes to run on digital books, televisions, computers and mobile devices.

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18 November 2010

How video games stretch the limits of our visual attention in a positive way

How video games stretch the limits of our visual attention in a positive way

November 18, 2010

They are often accused of being distracting, but recent research has found that action packed video games like Halo and Call of Duty can enhance visual attention, the ability that allows us to focus on relevant visual information. This growing body of research, reviewed in WIREs Cognitive Science, suggests that action based games could be used to improve military training, educational approaches, and certain visual deficits.

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